Classic Rimfire: The Winchester 62A 22 Pump in 13 Photos

Classic Rimfire: The Winchester 62A 22 Pump in 13 Photos

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The Winchester Model 62A came into being in 1939 or ’40 (depending on who you ask) as a distillation of earlier models 1890, 1906, and 62. It’s a pump (or slide) action rifle chambered for 22 rimfire, and is able to digest 22 Short, Long, and Long Rifle cartridges.

Right side of Winchester Model 62A 22 rifle. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Right side of Winchester Model 62A 22 rifle. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

This particular rifle has been used and abused, but has held up well.

Left side of Winchester 62A pump gun. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Left side of Winchester 62A pump gun. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

This old 62A was manufactured in 1954, four years before the last one was manufactured.

Right side with action open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Right side with action open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Working the slide action by moving the forearm rearward will open the bolt, which cocks the hammer. Empty shells are ejected upward when the action is opened.

Note the takedown screw, which is knurled and has a coin slot so you can easily break it down for cleaning or transport.

Left side of 62A, action open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Left side of 62A, action open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

In spite of all the shooting this rifle has seen — or perhaps because of it — the pump action is slick as a whistle.

Top view of the 62A, open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Top view of the 62A, open. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

You can’t open the action without pushing the rear end of the firing pin forward. This can be done by lowering the hammer into it, or by pushing it with your finger… for this reason, I don’t recommend cycling rounds through the action to unload this popper; instead, remove the magazine follower tube and let unused rounds slide out of the tube, then open the action to make sure the chamber is empty.

Arrow indicates a crack in the butt stock. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Arrow indicates a crack in the butt stock. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The butt stock has many cracks — the one shown here is pretty long. Someone really beat the heck out of this rifle years ago.

It breaks down, but it ain't broken! (Photo © Russ Chastain)

It breaks down, but it ain’t broken! (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Takedown guns are cool, and the 62A allows pretty good access for cleaning… and of course this allows you to store (or carry) the rifle in a shorter space.

62A's rear sight. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

62A’s rear sight. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The rear sight is a good one, apparently made by Redfield. The sight blade is reversible; note the smaller notch on the bottom. Elevation is adjusted via a notched elevator; windage by drifting the sight in its dovetail notch.

Top view of rear sight & forearm. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Top view of rear sight & forearm. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Note the missing chunk of wood from the forearm — with plenty of patina from much use after that happened. Someone carried this old gun for many miles.

Front sight of the Winchester 62A. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Front sight of the Winchester 62A. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The 62A’s front sight is of the classic shape that allows it to appear as a round bead when you’re aiming.

Muzzle of 62A 22 rimfire rifle. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Muzzle of 62A 22 rimfire rifle. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The muzzle has also been abused, but amazingly enough, the crown isn’t damaged and this rifle is quite accurate.

Earlier 62As had round forearms with grooves all the way around; this one has the newer beavertail forend.

62A's tubular magazine. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

62A’s tubular magazine. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The follower tube has been slipped most of the way out of the magazine tube in the photo above, and it’s ready for loading. When loading, you can continue to insert rounds (rim-down as the cutout indicates) until the last one you drop in is visible through the cutout.

Left side of Winchester 62A with some old ammo. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Left side of Winchester 62A with some old ammo. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

Gotta love the old classics — and it’s tough to beat a pump for dependability.

Some Specs

  • Make: Winchester
  • Model: 62A
  • Years made: 1939/40-1958
  • Action: Pump/Slide
  • Ammo: 22 Short, Long, Long Rifle
  • Magazine: Tubular, will hold 15 rounds of 22 LR
  • Overall length: 39 5/8 inches
  • Barrel length: 23 inches
  • Lengths when taken down: 26.5 and 16.5 inches
  • Weight: 5.5 pounds

The post Classic Rimfire: The Winchester 62A 22 Pump in 13 Photos appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

Hunting

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July 17, 2017 at 02:25PM

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