The Swedish Championships with Carl Gustav M/45

The Swedish Championships with Carl Gustav M/45

http://ift.tt/2eBnfSq

The Swedish Championships with Carl Gustav M/45 was held on August 25 at the Shooting Range Spillepengen in Malmoe, Southern Sweden.

The competitors shooting fully automatic Carl Gustav m/45 sub-machine guns are probably the least tactical people you will find.

And I will make you disappointed straight away – while the m/45 is fully auto only the competitors are only allowed to fire controlled single shots. It’s all about precision, not bursts.

However I think is the one and only, or at least one of the few, competitions where you are ONLY allowed to use fully automatic firearms? I would love feedback on that in the comments section if you know.

The Kulsprutepistol m/45, or short “Kpist m/45”, was made in Sweden and the standard issue firearm there from 1945 to 1965.It was later replaced by the Ak4 (HK G3) and the Ak5 (FN FNC).

Although the “Kpist” has retired there are still some sport shooting going on with them, there are probably around 1 500 to 2 000 of them in private ownership or with shooting clubs.

Shooting clubs would normally have a permanent permit, but for fully automatic firearms and handguns there is a 5 year renewal period where you have to prove activity, preferably some skill and need.

Below: M/45 with brass catcher. The stickers mean the firearm was controlled and approved for competition, so this one has probably been around for a while.

The design of the M/45 is very simple. The M/45 has a 36-round detachable box magazine

The m/45 fires from an open bolt and has a fixed firing pin. There is no safety! Due to the low recoil from the design and the 9×19 mm caliber it is fairly easy to control even in fully automatic.

Single shots, which are mandatory in the competition, have to be controlled by the shooter, but it’s easier than it sounds.

The list price of the Kpist m/45 was around SEK 600 (about 75 USD) in the late 1970s.

I think the market price today is around 1 500 SEK, roughly 190 USD. The bureaucracy to sell and export one is higher than the cost of the firearm itself.

All photos from Svenska Skyttesportförbundet.

You can find more pictures HERE.

Hunting

via The Firearm Blog http://ift.tt/ywCWoj

September 4, 2017 at 03:00AM

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s