Five Reasons the SIG MPX is Better Than the H&K MP5

Five Reasons the SIG MPX is Better Than the H&K MP5

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In episode one of a three part series for TFBTV, James shows TFB readers and viewers his H&K MP5 and SIG MPX and compares each to the other. Both of these pistol caliber carbines are configured in short-barrel-rifle format. Both of them are 9mm. Both of them have roots with respected manufacturers. But each of them has a few tricks up its sleeve that the other doesn’t. However, today, James tells us five ways that the SIG MPX is superior to the H&K MP5.

The SIG MPX is SIG’s new pistol caliber subgun that shares many features with the AR15/M16 platform, including a rotating bolt and common controls. It is also convertible from 9mm to .357SIG to .40S&W. James compares it to the Heckler & Koch MP5 and goes over the MPX’s strong points in today’s episode.

– Hey guys, James again with TFB TV, and I’m sitting here between these two lovely ladies.

The H&K MP5, and the SIG MPX, because I want to talk to you guys about some pros and cons of each.

So this is going to be a multi-part series video.

Today is going to be five reasons the SIG MPX is better than the H&K MP5.

But you bet your ass there’s gonna be five reasons why the H&K MP5 is better than the MPX, because there are some things that each of these platforms does better than the other.

But today we’re focusing on the MPX, which I believe is a platform with maybe a little bit more potential than the MP5.

While it’s not as old and proven as the MP5, it’s not as old as the MP5.

So it’s got a lot of new modern design cues that make it a little bit different and more versatile than the H&K.

So let’s get right into it with number one.

Number one has to be the mechanics.

The MPX, perhaps one of the biggest advantages, the mechanics versus the H&K MP5.

How you use the gun, how you manipulate it and get it to do what you want it to do.

It has ambidextrous everything.

An ambi. safety, an ambi. mag release, an ambi. bolt release, an AMB charging handle.

And speaking of that bolt release, you won’t find true bolt release on the H&K MP5 because it doesn’t have, the MP5, does not have an automatic latch round bolt hold up.

And that can be a serious issue.

With the MPX, whenever you run out of rounds in your magazine, your bolt’s gonna lock back, you can put a new mag in there, and then you can drop your bolt release on your back end.

So because that MP5 doesn’t have the latch round bolt hold up, in worst case scenario, you fire all the rounds in your magazine, you line up to take that last shot, you pull the trigger, and what’s the only noise that’s louder than a bang when you’re expecting a click? That’s a click when you’re expecting a bang.

You’ve gone completely dry, the MP5 doesn’t let you know that, so you’ve taken another shot, wasted a couple of seconds, and realized you had to reload.

Check it out to see what I’m talking about.

(gun fires, cans ping) (gun fires, cans ping) See? All that time wasted lining up my last shot and taking it.

(gun fires, cans ping) On the other hand, the MPX lets you know when you’ve gone empty.

It’s very easy to get another magazine in here, because unlike the MP5, you have a bevel and flared magazine well in the MPX.

And moreover, because of the last round bolt hold up, and you’re not fighting spring pressure against the bolt whenever you’re putting the magazine in.

Where, with the MP5, especially if you’ve got a fresh, 30 round magazine and the bolt’s closed, you’re really going to be struggling to get a positive lock with that new magazine, if you don’t open the bolt up with the MP5.

So mechanics, far and away the number one reason why the MPX is superior to the MP5.

Reason number two, AR-15 commonality.

The AR-15 is the most popular platform in the United States right now, and the good news is, if you know how to use an AR-15, you know how to use the MPX.

And what do I mean by commonality? Not only a common manual of arms, but you have some overlapping parts commonality.

You’re using an AR-15 charging handle, and you can use any AR-15 charging handle in the MPX.

You’ve got basically the exact same magazine release, you’ve got almost the exact same bolt release, you see you’ve got a ping pong paddle on the left hand side, if you prefer to use that.

But there’s also an ambi release here that you can actuate with your index finger.

The safety is in the same place, ambi, it functions the same way.

Down to fire, up for safe.

You can use AR-15 triggers, although there is a caveat there.

Because the bolt comes back much more violently in the pistol-caliber carbines, make sure that your trigger is going to work without breaking in the MPX, before you decide to change your trigger from the factory trigger.

You also get to use whatever AR-15 grip you like to use on your AR, you can use that on the MPX as well.

Not to mention your flip up iron sites.

So not only does this have a common manual of arms with the AR-15, but it uses a lot of the same parts, and that’s a huge plus, for those of you who are AR guys.

It even breaks apart the same way.

You see, you functionally have an AR-15 lower on the MPX, with the two pin take-down.

And it’s even got the same pins as I mentioned for the trigger.

This, for all intents and purposes, is as close as it gets to being a pistol-caliber AR-15 without being a pistol-caliber AR-15.

Number three, and another big issue, modularity.

With the MPX, you get a lot more modularity that you don’t otherwise have with the MP5.

As you see, you have a full top rail with the MPX, you can put whatever optics you want to put on the MPX.

You can change out your irons, not so with the MP5, and you’re stuck with the irons on the MP5.

Now, fortunately, the diopter sites are some of the best out there, so that’s not such a bad thing.

But you still don’t have the option.

You can also, with the MPX, change it at home, user-serviceable to any barrel length that you want between four inches and 16 inches.

And you can change out the hand guard yourself.

Although with the MP5, you can buy a modular hand guard.

The stock is attached in the rear via picatinny rail, so it’s very easy to find stock adapters for it.

My number four reason is going to be chassis design.

The MPX in my opinion has a superior chassy design to the MP5.

The chassy of the MPX is almost completely aluminum, so it’s going to be light weight, it’s going to be durable, and it’s going to be corrosion resistant.

That’s not the case with the MP5.

With the MP5, you’re looking at a steel gun that can rust, it’s heavy, and with the trigger group and the lower, you’re using polimer instead of the aluminum lower that the MPX has.

So not only is the MPX in ay similar configuration to the MP5 going to be about a pound lighter, it’s going to be just as durable, if not more durable, because of the lack of polimer.

But it’s also going to be lighter.

And with the MPX, right out of the box, you get a free float hand guard that’s partially monolithic, you can change it out.

And that makes it, in and of itself, superior to the MP5.

The MP5, you’re typically going to get just a plastic hand guard held in place by one pin, and you have some expensive but less attractive options for a picatinny rail or a keymod hand guard for the MP5.

And while you can change out the barrel lengths freely with the MPX, you can’t do that with the MP5, you’re gonna need an armor for that.

Now finally, I’ve just given you four really good reasons why the MPX is better than the MP5.

But for number five, not withstanding the fact that you get, I think, a whole lot of value out of the MPX over the MP5, but let’s talk about cost.

I think this gun cost me about $1,200 in pistol format, and then I got my stamp, and I think I paid about $250 or $300 for the stock.

Now the market’s so volatile with these guns, you never know, at the time of this post, they’d be selling for $1,000, they could be selling for $1,500, but at the end of the day, I paid around $1,400 and $1,500 for the MPX.

I paid about $1,500 for my MP5 parts kit alone.

So my MP5 is built on an HK, an authentic HK MP5 parts kit, and then it uses an MKE, a Turkish MKE receiver, which I had to buy.

And just that receiver flat cost $400, because it was made on HK tooling in Turkey.

So you guys may be familiar with Zenith.

Zenith makes HK clones, but they are made on the Turkish HK tooling, just like my MKE flat was.

But even for the Zenith clones, which are, by all indications, really good clones, those are still gonna set you back about $2,000.

While if you wanna buy an MP5 complete, you’re looking at four, $5,000 for an HK 94 or a converted HK 94.

My MP5, looking at $1,500 for the parts kit, $400 for the receiver, and I don’t even remember how much it cost to send the gun off to get refinished and assembled.

So while there’s a good argument that you’re getting a lot more gun with the MPX, it cost about half as much as the MP5, and that’s the number five reason why it is better than the MP5.

In any case, I hope you guys enjoyed watching this video as much as I enjoyed making it.

I want to say thank you to Proxibid.

If you guys are looking for an HK, Proxibid’s a great place to find one.

And I want to say thank you to Ventura Munitions for sending us the ammo.

Thank you to patron supporters, subscribers, viewers.

I will see you guys next week, take care.

(upbeat music)

Hunting

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October 5, 2017 at 04:31PM

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