Going the Distance: How to Sight in Your Compound Bow

Going the Distance: How to Sight in Your Compound Bow

http://ift.tt/2AFMufX

What’s the difference between accuracy and precision? Accuracy is hitting where your aim. Precision is hitting the same spot every time. Archery requires both.

To achieve precision, you need good form and equipment. Accuracy is easier. You simply move your sight until the arrows hit where you aim.

When you buy your bow, the archery shop’s pros will help adjust your sight. Still, it’s a skill you must master yourself because you’ll need to make fine sighting adjustments, and you’ll likely want to shoot longer distances once you’re outside. It’s also good to know how to do basic work on your equipment.

Tools

sight

If you are needing to tighten up your sight because of that pesky loose screw. Allen wrenches are an archer’s best friend and can easily fit inside a quiver pocket. Photo Credit: Heather Koehl

Most sights need an Allen wrench so you can loosen the screws to make adjustments. You’ll also use Allen wrenches for your bow and most other accessories. Pick up a set the next time you visit the archery store, and ask its experts for specifics on how to use and adjust your sight.

Start Close

By adjusting your sights for the three-arrow average, you reduce the effects of human error. If you can shoot three arrows into a tight group, you’ve mastered the hardest part of precision. Photo Credit: Shane Indrebo.

To start the adjustment process, stand close to the target so you can easily shoot three arrows into a “group.” A group is a cluster of arrows that strike close to each other in the target.

Why three arrows? By adjusting your sights for the three-arrow average, you reduce the effects of human error. If you can shoot three arrows into a tight group, you’ve mastered the hardest part of precision. Next, adjust your sight to achieve accuracy.

Left and Right

sight

If your arrows group to the left, move your sight to the left. If your arrows hit to the right, move your sight to the right. Photo Credit: Heather Koehl

First you adjust your horizontal plane. If your arrows group to the left, move your sight to the left. If your arrows hit to the right, move your sight to the right.

To help remember which way to move your sight, imagine adjusting it until it covers your group. Make small adjustments until you get a feel for how far to move to the sight.

*Tip: Close distances require greater adjustments to see results. Farther distances need smaller adjustments to see results.

Up and Down

sight

Remember you want to follow your arrow group. If you’re low of center, move your sight down to follow your group. This will raise your group into the middle. Photo Credit: blogline11

Next, make your vertical adjustments. If you use a sight with multiple pins, set the top pin as the closest distance, and the bottom pin as the farthest. If you use a single-pin sight, you’ll keep track of your settings by marking the sight tape.

As with your horizontal adjustments, chase the arrows with your sight. If your arrows hit high, move your sight up. If your arrows hit low, move your sight down. It’s that easy!

To shoot farther distances, keep moving away from the target until you run out of pins or your groups become inconsistent.

Sighting in takes some “guess and check.” Don’t get discouraged if you make the wrong adjustment, or struggle to perfectly align the sight. Just keep making small adjustments and focus on making good shots.

If you need help dialing in, contact an archery instructor or visit a nearby archery shop. Find a nearby store here.

The post Going the Distance: How to Sight in Your Compound Bow appeared first on Archery 360.

Hunting

via Archery 360 http://ift.tt/1kGTeuu

November 28, 2017 at 08:47PM

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s