TFBTV Reviews the $8,000 FK BRNO Field Pistol: The Fastest Production Pistol in the World (?)

TFBTV Reviews the $8,000 FK BRNO Field Pistol: The Fastest Production Pistol in the World (?)

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In this episode of TFBTV, James looks at the luxurious FK BRNO Field Pistol in 7.5mm FK. According to FK BRNO:

“The 7.5 FK Field Pistol is a single action, tilting barrel type mechanism, with a proprietary recoil attenuating system. This is not a modified design of another product or pistol model. This is a completely new and unique concept and design and the intellectual rights to the system have been registered and claimed by FK BRNO. The design is very ergonomic and even though the magazine holds 15 – 35 mm long rounds, the smallest hands are able to fully wrap around the optimally angled grip of the pistol. The frame and slide are very slender and streamlined for such a size cartridge and caliber.”

TFB’s own Pete already covered the FK BRNO in full at http://ift.tt/2jhoOTJ and concluded:

With every advancement comes a price – literally/figuratively. While Luxury Firearms, FK BRNO’s exclusive importer/distributor, would like you to contact them for official pricing, current estimates rangebetween $7K-$8K. That’s a lot to ask for a handgun. The “physical” price is evident in the Field Pistol’s length and weight – at 10 inches and three pounds, it is not the largest pistol on the market, but it is a lot to hang off a belt. Ammunition pricing has yet to be officially set, but because of limited availability and uniqueness, I would guess MSRP will push the $1/round mark.

If the major barriers of size, weight and price don’t concern you, the FK BRNO Field Pistol would make quite the target, hunting or personal defense weapon.”

– Hey guys, James here with TFB TV, and I have a very special treat for you today.

That is the FK BRNO Field Pistol, and 7.5 millimeter FK.

There’s no other way to say it, this is a boutique, luxury pistol that shoots somewhat of a novelty cartridge, and it costs around $7000 to $8000.

Now, is it worth $7000 to $8000? Well, listen to the rest of the video, I’ll explain it to you, and if you’ve got seven or eight grand lying around, you can decide.

First thing’s first, FK BRNO, F-K B-R-N-O, yes, it almost spells (censored) Bruno.

I know that’s gonna come up in the comments, so I’m gonna hit that right off at the pass, and we can move on! So, what is the Field Pistol? Well, the FK BRNO Field Pistol is a top end gun that fires a very hot cartridge.

The FK BRNO Field Pistol is, quote unquote, the fastest pistol in the world, shooting a 95 grain bullet that’s roughly the size of a 380 or a very small 9 millimeter round at about 2000 feet per second.

That generates a tremendous amount of force.

You’re looking at about 850 foot pounds of pressure.

Now, that’s about two times as much as the 420 to 450 foot pounds that you can expect from most hollow point 40 S&W.

And speaking of 40 S&W, even though you’re looking at twice the power of the 40 S&W, the recoil is about on part with a standard 40 S&W, say, like a Glock 23 or a Glock 22.

Now, it’s hard to tell if that’s by virtue of the weight.

Again, we’re talking almost three pounds of gun, or if that’s a result of the counterbalancing recoil system.

As you can see here, it has a very robust recoil system, and if you look under the dust cover right here, you can see what appears to be a very large cylinder that accommodates a counterweight.

So, you actually have a pretty substantial counterweight that is right now at the muzzle end of the gun, and it works its way towards the trigger every time the gun goes into recoil.

So, hypothetically speaking, that acts as a counterweight.

Does it work? I really don’t know.

It’s a very simple device, and the fact of the matter is, the gun weighs three pounds.

It’s gonna sap up a lot of recoil because of the weight, and I’ll tell you this, for a gun that hits twice as hard as a 40, again, your recoil’s going to be about the same as the 40.

Even though the Field Pistol’s made in the Czech Republic and it looks like a CZ 75, it smells like a CZ 75, it feels like a CZ 75, it really is its own design, using a solid length but tilting barrel, and the aforementioned recoil system that’s unique to the gun.

It weighs 46 ounces, it has a six inch long barrel, and it has about a 10 inch sight radius.

This gun is 10 inches long, it is not small.

However, the grip’s pretty slender, so you don’t have to be a hulking giant in order to operate the gun, to get your hands around the grip.

As you can see here, I mean, it just feels like even thinner, especially with these thin aluminum grips, than your average CZ 75.

Now let’s talk about another unique feature of the Field Pistol, and that is the butterfly sight system.

As you can see here, it almost looks like a hollowed out bow tie, and then you have a very, very small red dot front sight.

I will say that the butterfly sight system allows for incredible precision.

You’ve got, as you can see, a little rear peep sight, and in that peep, you align a very small front sight, so you don’t find yourself, especially if you’re shooting at 100 yards or more, you’re not going to be covering your target and it’s going to allow you to make more precise shots.

But what I discovered shooting at the St. Bernard Shooting Center, and guys, thank you for letting me use your range to shoot the gun this morning.

What we learned today is combat-style shooting in low light, it’s not really that good.

It requires a little bit too much thought, a little bit too much precision, and it’s very hard to see the front sight and align the rear sight when you’re indoors.

But fortunately, the FK BRNO also packages the Field Pistol with a rear two dot sight, so if you don’t like the butterfly sight, you can just remove it, and you can throw a standard combat rear two dot sight on there, and your problem’s solved.

With that said, if you really are looking for precision, and I feel like a lot of shooters will be, then you should probably keep the butterfly sight on there.

Speaking of shooting at 100 yards, we are on a very tight production schedule with this gun.

I wanted to be able to shoot it, I want Andrew to be able to shoot it.

You’re going to be able to see his ballistics testing of the 7.5 FK round in the very near future.

But we’re on a tight schedule, and FK BRNO, when they sent me, this is Field Pistol serial number nine, so I’ve got a very early model.

It’s one that’s toured shows, and it’s been on expo floors, so it didn’t have a firing pin when it got to me.

FK BRNO had to send me the firing pin, and I installed it today, so I only got to shoot it at 50 feet today.

However, Pete with TFB did a more detailed written review.

He got to shoot 12 inch plates at 100 yards, and he said he was dingin’ ’em all day, and I believe it, because not only does that butterfly sight system allow for that sort of precision, but it’s a very flat-shooting round.

That 95 grain all copper round is still moving at 1600 feet per second whenever it reaches 100 yards, and that’s much more powerful than a 45 cal round from the muzzle.

FK BRNO guarantees that the Field Pistol will shoot tighter than a four inch group at 100 yards.

So why’d FK BRNO make the Field Pistol? It’s a very easy answer, and that’s.

(sighing) Seriously, I don’t know what purpose the FK BRNO Field Pistol is supposed to serve, but who cares, because when you look at those raw numbers, you’re talking 850 foot pounds of energy at the muzzle, and around 450 or 500 foot pounds of energy at 100 yards in a package that you can fit in a holster on your waistband, and by the way, they do package it with a really nice leather holster, and in a really nice waterproof case.

You can use your imagination.

You can use this, I suppose, for personal defense, target shooting, hunting, whatever.

If you need a lot of power in a flat shooting round in a low recoiling platform, then give the Field Pistol a hard look.

And looking at this pistol, for seven or eight grand, as you would expect, it absolutely drips with quality.

Very nice, slim, anodized aluminum grips.

It’s got a full-length rail system, similar to the CZ 75.

You’ve got the rails and the slide riding below and fully within the rails of the frame.

The trigger on this gun is incredible.

You’re looking at four to four and a half pounds.

You’ve got a little bit of take up, like a couple millimeters of take up, and then once you hit that wall, all it takes is about four pounds of pressure to put it over.

Everything on this gun is like baby oil on a stripper pole.

Very smooth, very slick.

It just feels good to wrack this slide.

Assembly and disassembly showed me there are no machining marks whatsoever.

This gun is very precise, I mean, down to the millimeter.

The tolerances are very tight, but performance was fantastic.

Guys, this is a screamer of a round.

Listen to this (censored) reverberation whenever I shot it indoors at the St. Bernard Indoor Shooting Center.

That’s crazy, right? But we were shooting very quick, very casual offhand groups within two and a half, three inch circles at 50 feet.

This really is an impressive gun.

As I said, it comes in this really nice Pelican-style case with two 15 round magazines.

Now, Pete couldn’t stuff more than 12 rounds in his magazines.

I could get in about 14.

That’s to be expected because Pete is a tremendous pussy, so I could stuff a couple extra rounds, but I couldn’t get that 15th one in there myself.

It’s got a beveled and flared magazine well, magazine changes are very easy, the mechanics are good, the ergonomics are good, it fits in your hand well.

As far as the ammunition goes, made in the United States.

You’re looking at a buck a round, which is expensive, but frankly a little bit less than I anticipated for what is a novelty boutique cartridge like this, especially with this type of performance.

So, 50 bucks a box, but look at it this way, if you’re driving a Ferrari, you’re gonna have to put premium in it.

If you wanna run with the big dogs with a $7000 or $8000 gun, (barking) then you’re gonna pay for the ammo, let’s be honest with ourselves.

So, final thoughts on the FK BRNO Field Pistol.

I thought this gun was (censored) awesome.

However, it’s also a $7000 to $8000 gun.

Would I ever buy one personally? Absolutely not, but you might.

Again, look at the numbers.

There’s nothing else like it on the market today.

Not only is it a premium gun, and it works well, and it has a fantastic trigger, but it shoots a very interesting and very powerful cartridge, so in my opinion, that in and of itself is going to generate a lot of buzz, and even if the Field Pistol itself doesn’t necessarily take off, I could certainly see more platforms being introduced to accept the 7.5 FK round.

So, all in all, gun good, performance good, price bad.

Would I buy, no, would you buy, maybe, I don’t know.

But anyways, I thought it was cool.

Thank you so much to FK BRNO for sending me this gun and all the ammo.

I wish them the best of luck, because this is truly an innovative new gun, and I hope it really catches on.

I’m a little pessimistic, again, when you’re approaching $10,000 for the FK BRNO Field Pistol and, say, a case of ammo, then it looks a little dicey.

But really I hope it does well.

Thank you, as usual, to Proxibid.

I’m not sure that there are FK BRNO pistols on Proxibid just yet, but keep your eyes peeled, and maybe if they do take off, they will be.

As usual, thank you guys so much for watching.

Thank you to our Patreon supporters especially.

Guys, please get on Patreon and support us, even if it’s just a buck a month, it helps tremendously.

I will see you next week.

(upbeat music)

Hunting

via The Firearm Blog http://ift.tt/ywCWoj

December 4, 2017 at 05:01PM

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